Advent Table: The Journey Of The Three Kings

by Annette
(Germany)

And she brought forth her firstborn son, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn.

And she brought forth her firstborn son, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn.

And she brought forth her firstborn son, and laid him in a manger; because there was no room for them in the inn.
And the angel said unto them, fear not, for behold: I bring you good tidings of great joy.
For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.
And they came with haste, and found Mary, and Joseph, and the babe.

Every year at the beginning of Advent, we create a nativity scene with traditional wooden figures: the magi and their entourage, the shepherds with the angel and the crèche with Mary, Joseph and the new-born baby.


This year’s version was set up as a centrepiece on our dining table.

To symbolize the journey from the beginning of Advent to Christmas Eve, we set the Three Kings far away from the manger, at the other end of the table.

As they follow the star, each day they come a little closer to the nativity scene until, on Christmas Eve, they have arrived at the stable in Bethlehem.

There's also an Advent wreath on the table. We make one every year with moss from the woodland behind our house. (You should be able to buy similar at florists’ or nurseries.)





To create the wreath, you simply nail moss patches onto a straw core. It's best to use nails with very small heads. Start with larger pieces of moss (about 10in diameter), and then fill in the gaps with smaller patches. No moss is needed underneath the wreath.




At the end, we push spiked candleholders into the wreath for the four Advent candles. We have different candle colours every year; this time our son chose burgundy :-)




I hope you all had a wonderful Christmas!


› Advent Table: Journey Of The Three Kings

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Candleholders
by: Renate

Marcia, I don't know where you would get them outside Europe, but there are two workarounds.

1. Use (wide) metal bottlecaps as candle holders: Drive a long flat-headed nail through the center of each bottlecap so that the rim of the bottlecap points 'up' and the sharp end of the nail points 'down'. Glue nailhead & bottlecap together if necessary, and fix the candle into place with a bit of hot wax.

2. (Not for children - be extremely careful if you do this:) If you have a gas stove, safely grip the sharp end of a long nail (about 2 inches) with pliers, and hold the nail head into the flame. Never touch the nail with your bare hands. Once the nailhead is heated up, hold your Advent candle upside down and insert the nailhead into the bottom end of the candle (about 1/2 inch deep). The hot nailhead will easily melt its way into the candle stump. Hold it steady and keep the candle upside down until the wax is sufficiently settled. Allow to cool completely before inserting the candle'stake' into the wreath. (We used this trick in University when we didn't have money for fancy supplies.)

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Candleholders
by: Marcia

Does anyone know where I can get spiked candleholders like these?

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Ostheimer fugures
by: Renate

Jenny, I just found Ostheimer figures at Amazon, including a fairly comprehensive nativity collection. Couldn't find the manger, though :-(

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Wooden figures
by: Annette

Jenny, they're Ostheimer figures, handmade in Germany. I'm pretty sure you can get them in the USA!

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Beautiful wooden figures!
by: Jenny

I really like those figures. Can I get them in the USA?

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What a wonderful idea.
by: Renate

To have a 'moving' Christmas centerpiece that tells a story - wow, that is amazing. And I like the 'zen' spirit of your Christmas table setting; just the sparse wooden figures with their smooth shapes and simple colors.

Readers will also appreciate your wreath making instructions! I imagine you could use a styrofoam wreath shape if you can't get a straw core. The 'wild' moss looks very beautiful indeed.

Thank you very much for sharing your lovely ideas, Annette!

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